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Lilith tastes.

by Jasey Crowl

Art Print

$0.00

Collect your choice of gallery quality Giclée, or fine art prints custom trimmed by hand in a variety of sizes with a white border for framing.

The first woman's first bite.

The first woman's first bite in HQ.

Version #4 high-res:

From Wikipedia: Lilith (Hebrew: לילית‎; lilit, or lilith) is a character in Jewish mythology, developed earliest in the Babylonian Talmud, who is generally thought to be related to a class of female demons Līlīṯu in Mesopotamian texts. However, Lowell K. Handy (1997) notes, "Very little information has been found relating to the Akkadian and Babylonian view of these demons. Two sources of information previously used to define Lilith are both suspect."[1] The two problematic sources are the Gilgamesh appendix and the Arslan Tash amulets, which are discussed below.[2]

The term Lilith occurs in Isaiah 34:14, either singular or plural according to variations in the earliest manuscripts, though in a list of animals. In the Dead Sea Scrolls Songs of the Sage the term first occurs in a list of monsters. In Jewish magical inscriptions, on bowls and amulets from the 6th century CE onwards, Lilith is identified as a female demon and the first visual depictions appear.

In Jewish folklore, from the 8th–10th centuries Alphabet of Ben Sira onwards, Lilith becomes Adam's first wife, who was created at the same time and from the same earth as Adam. This contrasts with Eve, who was created from one of Adam's ribs. The legend was greatly developed during the Middle Ages, in the tradition of Aggadic midrashim, the Zohar and Jewish mysticism.[3] In the 13th Century writings of Rabbi Isaac ben Jacob ha-Cohen, for example, Lilith left Adam after she refused to become subservient to him and then would not return to the Garden of Eden after she mated with archangel Samael.[4] The resulting Lilith legend is still commonly used as source material in modern Western culture, literature, occultism, fantasy, and horror.

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Eternal commented on March 6, 2012 12:54am
Wow awesome work!! love the colour scheme!! :)
Gary Barling commented on March 8, 2012 2:36am
very nice
Fluxbits commented on March 15, 2012 11:34pm
Great!
Jasmin Bogade commented on April 5, 2012 1:51am
Great color contrast. Beautiful red tone!
Jess Polanshek commented on June 8, 2012 6:21pm
This is quite awesome.
Captive Images Photography commented on July 9, 2012 3:24pm
I really like this... great work!
Jake Stanton commented on July 9, 2012 3:25pm
Wow! Such beauty and detail! the eye is drawn right in!
Nzinga.Mbandi commented on July 20, 2012 10:58am
I fancy her tastes! :)
Catspaws commented on August 17, 2012 9:45am
lovely
Jasey Crowl commented on October 6, 2012 9:58am
Thanks everybody, I'll continue working on the series!
Goreville commented on March 4, 2013 1:00pm
LOVE this! Got the t-shirt in pink. Looks so good.
Tyler Spangler commented on February 12, 2014 11:45pm
Love this!!