Today Get 20% Off + Free Shipping on Apparel, Totes, Tapestries, Phone Cases and Mugs!
Close
You have (0 items) in your Wishlist
No Items in Wishlist

To add items to your wishlist, simply click the "Add to Wishlist" link from any product page.

Don't see Wishlist items you've previously added? Create an account or login now on all devices to sync your Wishlist.

  • 26Promote

Art Print

  • FRAME THIS PRINT
DESCRIPTION

Collect your choice of gallery quality Giclée, or fine art prints custom trimmed by hand in a variety of sizes with a white border for framing.

ABOUT THE ART

There were only three flag designs adopted, with later, minor variants made to those designs, that served as the official national flags of the Confederate States of America and used during its existence from 1861 to 1865. Since the end of the American Civil War, personal and official use of Confederate flags, and of flags derived from these, has continued under some controversy.
The state flags of Mississippi and Georgia are based on Confederate flags. The flag of North Carolina is based on the state's 1861 flag, which dates back to the Confederacy and appears to be based on the first Confederate flag. The flags of Alabama and Florida appear to be of Confederate inspiration, but are actually derived from the Cross of Burgundy flag, which flew over the territory of Spanish Florida.
The display of the Confederate flag is a highly controversial topic. It was largely absent during the Civil War, Rather, the Confederate flag was reintroduced in 1956, just two years after the Supreme Court decision Brown v Board of Education. It was considered by many to be a protest against school desegregation. It was raised at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) during protests against integration of schools.
Supporters of the flag view it as a symbol of southern heritage and the independence of the distinct cultural tradition of the South from the North. Some groups use the Southern Cross as one of the symbols associated with their organizations, including groups such as the Ku Klux Klan.
For some, the flag represents only a past era of southern sovereignty. Some historical societies such as the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy also use the flag as part of their symbols. Some rockabilly fans hold the Confederate flag as their emblem as well.
As a result of these varying perceptions, there have been a number of political controversies surrounding the use of the Confederate flag in Southern state flags, at sporting events, at Southern universities, and on public buildings. According to Civil War historian and native Southerner Shelby Foote, the flag traditionally represented the South's resistance to Northern political dominance; it became racially charged during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s, when fighting against desegregation suddenly became the focal point of that resistance.
Symbols of the Confederacy remain a contentious issue across the United States and their civic placement has been debated vigorously in many Southern state legislatures since the 1990s. Supporters have labeled attempts to display the flag as an exercise of free speech in response to bans in some schools and universities, but have not always been successful in court when attempting to use this justification.
Source: Wikipedia
Also used on the "Dukes of Hazard" roof of the General Lee - Dodge Charger :)




Catspaws commented on November 9, 2013 1:04am
cool