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Posts

November 12
50Promote
Six Pack ::: 11.12.14

 

This week, we feature Georgiath, Citizon, Ryo Takemasa, Chris Sallquist, Andrea Dalla Barba (feature img) and Zsolt Vidak.

The Six Pack showcases the diversity in style, medium, concept and genre found on Society6. With an ever-growing community, we think it's important to create opporunities for artists to connect with one another. This is one of those methods and these are a handful of artists our team has collectively discovered through our own exploration.

It might go without saying, but we all play a role in promoting one another. If something really speaks to you, promote it. If you'd buy an artist a beer, follow them.

Per usual, please share your own artist discoveries in the comments below!

 

 

Check the last three Six Packs :::

Six Pack ::: 11.05.14

Six Pack ::: 10.29.14

Six Pack ::: 10.22.14

 

Six Pack

November 5
83Promote
Six Pack ::: 11.05.14

 

This week, we put a spotlight on Matt Dean, Karo Rigaud, Koning, Thom Easton, Evren Yilmaz and Raquel Garcia Macia.

The Six Pack showcases the diversity in style, medium, concept and genre found on Society6. With an ever-growing community, we think it's important to create opporunities for artists to connect with one another. This is one of those methods and these are a handful of artists our team has collectively discovered through our own exploration.

It might go without saying, but we all play a role in promoting one another. If something really speaks to you, promote it. If you'd buy an artist a beer, follow them.

Per usual, please share your own artist discoveries in the comments below!

 

 

Six Pack

November 4
71Promote
Ezekiel x Society6 Limited Edition Wall Clocks are here!

A few months back we announced the contributing artists for the Ezekiel x Society6 'All We Have Is Now' collaboration. Five Society6 artists hustled to produce some amazing designs around the temporal nature of living and the fact we're guaranteed nothing but this moment.

Now we're proud to share that work with the rest of the community in the form of a limited edition series of wall clocks by artists:

Frank Moth

Anna Pietrzak

Vin Ganapathy

NGHBRS

David Cristobal

Each design is limited to an edition of 100 clocks and all include an exclusive gift print designed and produced by Ezekiel Clothing. They will be sold on Society6, Ezekiel's site and in select Active Ride Shops.

Check out the collection here.

On top of the limited run, all artists received prominent ad placement in the 2014 Monster Children Photo Annual and were loaded up with gear from the Ezekiel Clothing catalogue.

Ezekiel x Society6 Limited Edition Wall Clocks are here!

Help us congratulate all the contributing artists in helping us kill time with some seriously badass clocks!

More collaborations on the way! Stay tuned.

Ezekiel's Statement:

The All We Have is Now Artist Collaboration series represents a collaboration between Ezekiel and artists looking to express the temporal nature of living. The program in its simplest form is an enabler and amplifier for individuals and collectives to reach a broader audience with their work, through our motto "All We Have Is Now".

More Ezekiel Clothing

Ezekiel's S6 Shop

Active Ride Shop

Monster Children 

Ezekiel x Society6 Limited Edition Wall Clocks are here!

Ezekiel x Society6 Limited Edition Wall Clocks are here!

ProductsCollaboration

October 29
100Promote
Six Pack ::: 10.29.14

 

This week, we put a spotlight on ArtandGhosts, Victoria Borges, Los ilustrados, Arron Croasdell, Super Future Kid and Kristen Liu-Wong.

The Six Pack showcases the diversity in style, medium, concept and genre found on Society6. With an ever-growing community, we think it's important to create opporunities for artists to connect with one another. This is one of those methods and these are a handful of artists our team has collectively discovered through our own exploration.

It might go without saying, but we all play a role in promoting one another. If something really speaks to you, promote it. If you'd buy an artist a beer, follow them.

Per usual, please share your own artist discoveries in the comments below!

 

 

Six Pack

October 28
97Promote
Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

We talk to master manipulator and S6 artist, Josh Dykgraaf about his artwork. Amidst a highly creative blend of photocollage, illustration and 3d stylings, he manages to bring his own photos to life in ways most can't imagine. With a growing fanbase and clients like the Australian government, this dude stays busy. And when he's not illustrating with Photoshop, he's writing tutorials to educate the masses. I caught Josh just before a London trip to see his work on display in the Underground (aka the Tube). Here's the quick exchange with this Aussie living in Amsterdam.

Ben: Why the move to Amsterdam?

Josh: I studied in Germany and visited here a couple of times during that period and pretty much fell in love with the place. I moved here in 2013 and, for the moment, it's base camp.

What's the quick n dirty of how you photo manipulate/illustrate?

Short version? I'll cut 20-30 items out of photos as a starting point. I'll warp and distort to create a basic shape - playing around until I have a basic structure. From there I add more detail pieces progressively and build a scene around my subject. Towards the end of the project I use adjustment layers and layer masks to shade each object individually. Lastly, I sprinkle some envirmental effects like water, smoke or earth to help blend it together or perhaps add a sense of locomotion.

The pen tool, transform and puppet warp are my best friends. 

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

Dragon Airways

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

My Siberia 

You photograph just about everything you use. How do you know what angles to shoot?

Angles can be tough. For example, in the "My Siberia" image, the face is actually a manipulation from an eye level shot of the engine. Sometimes I'll model it in 3D if I need an unusual angle of a key piece - like facial elements.

Very often I'll get an idea of what I want to do while I'm walking around experiencing a city, and get relevant angles of the content. More often though, it's more of a case of getting a good variety of angles and generating the idea later. Sometimes I won't have a concept until I start mixing and matching.

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

Planned Evolution 2010

 How did you discover this blend of 3D, illustration, photography and collage was your "thing"?

I basically developed this style while procrastinating. Not doing the uni work I was supposed to be doing in my final year. I eventually managed to turn it into my thesis project.

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

The Great Reef Serpent

 How long are you spending on these?

My work takes anywhere from 40 to 100 hours to complete an image. At the end of the process, it's always supremely gratifying to actually finish an image.

What are some big clients you've worked for or collab'd with?

I do a fair bit of advertising work but my biggest and by far favourite job, so far, was actually for the Australian government in my home city, the capital of Canberra. They commissioned me to illustrate the outsides of a fleet of buses to help celebrate the 100th birthday of the city last year. It's hard to top the satisfaction of watching your work go by on the side of a bus on a daily basis.

Dream collab or client?

Dream collab would be fellow Australian Justin Maller. His work got me interested in Photoshop years ago and he still impresses me. My dream client would be producing artwork for a major music festival - the considerable creative freedom of music work with a budget. There are numerous cities on my "to-do" list to remix too in the Americas like Rio and New York. If someone wants to pay me to do that, that'd be ok too.

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

Sasquatch Reborn (Seattle, United States)

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

Mechanical Phoenix (Toronto, Canada)

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

Hamburg Behemoth (Hamburg, Germany)

Any advice do you have for aspiring artists?

Work hard and don't give up.  

Any cool personal projects? Gallery showings? Upcoming events? Etc?

My work is on show at the moment on billboards in a few London Tube stations as part of "Art Below London" and at a show at "The Framer's Gallery" nearby. You can see it at Regent's Park and Pimilco stations. I have some London themed work on Society6 as of now!

More Josh Dykgraaf // society6 shopwebsiteFacebook

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

Josh beside "Old Reliable" for his participation in ArtBelow

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

Old Reliable (London, England)

Quickie with Josh Dykgraaf

The Towers of London (London, England)

Quickie

October 22
61Promote
Six Pack ::: 10.22.14

This week's Six Pack features COMME UNE AFFICHE AU MUR, Kemi Mai, Javier Ramos, Jess Worby, Jam85 and TRASH RIOT.

The Six Pack showcases the diversity in style, medium, concept and genre found on Society6. With an ever-growing community, we think it's important to create opporunities for artists to connect with one another. This is one of those methods and these are a handful of artists our team has collectively discovered through our own exploration.

It might go without saying, but we all play a role in promoting one another. If something really speaks to you, promote it. If you'd buy an artist a beer, follow them.

Per usual, please share your own artist discoveries in the comments below!

 

Six Pack ::: 10.22.14
PANAM AIRLINES (Arrete-moi si tu peux)
Six Pack ::: 10.22.14
Alien's Head
Six Pack ::: 10.22.14
Feeling Good, How Are You?
by Jam85
Six Pack ::: 10.22.14
Water Me
Six Pack ::: 10.22.14
Soldiers
Six Pack ::: 10.22.14
Walls

 

Six Pack

October 21
130Promote
Show Us Your Workspace

Here's the deal. We want to put a spotlight on the sickest workspaces our community is creating from. What are we asking for? Give us the grand tour. Post your best studio photos and tell us about the space. We want to feature the clever, the cool, the collective, the clean and the cluttered.

Did I miss any c's or l's?

As for the photos, we're looking for sharp images with nice composition. Blurry might work for showing friends, but we want to see your space in all its glory. In other words, if we put these photos on our homepage, would they represent the quality of your work?

Take pictures to inspire the community. Feel free to cause a little studio-envy while you're at it.

Some quick tips on posting:

  • Click on "Post & Sell" in the upper right hand corner.
  • Uncheck "Make this artwork immediately..." in the blue box.

Then, add these three (3) things:

  • TITLE your post "Studio Tour: Your Artist Name".
  • DESCRIPTION. Tell us about your space. What really goes on in there? Where's your studio located? What are the most influential elements of your workspace and why?
  • SELECT FILES. Add your best studio pics.

Here's a few examples:

Show Us Your Workspace

Max-o-matic

Show Us Your Workspace

Alejandro Giraldo

Show Us Your Workspace

Jon MacNair

Show Us Your Workspace

Bill Noir

Studio Tour

October 16
97Promote
Tag your work: HOLIDAZE

The holidays are fast approaching, which means people will be on the hunt for the perfect gift for their favorite art-lover.

Over the next couple of weeks we will be curating a bunch of gift guides to help surface some great art and awesome products, making gift-giving easier for all!

We invite you to tag your holiday/winter themed art with the word "HOLIDAZE" if you'd like it to be considered. You can do so by updating your description. It doesn't matter if it's a new upload or an older piece!

We will be searching this tag and pulling some select pieces for inclusion in our gift guides and holiday collections.

Looking forward to seeing what you've got!

 

Header background art by Chobopop

Seller Tips

133Promote
Artist Interview: Rudy Faber

Rudy Faber, a digital illustrator and traditional painter, lives and works from a small creative flat in Leeuwarden, Netherlands. Bouncing back from a severe 9-to-5 burnout, he talks tattoos, the women of his work, his pregnant mannequin and hints at a "hush hush" Playstation 4 project. His thematic diversity is inspired by tattoos, Americana, Japanese folkore and an appreciation for the female figure. 

BEN: Can you tell us a bit about your workspace?

RUDY: My creative space is just a small room in which all my painting gear and digital set-up is crammed up in one. The fact that I'm kind of hoarder as well - books, toys, dolls, skulls, etcetera - makes this room, and my entire living space, often look like an incredibly messy, unorganized wunderkammer of sorts.

Artist Interview: Rudy Faber

A lot of tattoo-inspired art comes out of here. What about tattoos can't you get enough of? 

I consider many styles of tattoos as a high form of art. It bothers me when I hear people speak of how tattoos are just some trend and everybody will regret theirs when they hit 50. They put every form of tattooing in the same category of being some low and dumb form of self expression. But they seem to lack the ability to see the difference between those small trendy tattoos and, for instance, the ancient art of Japanese Irezumi. The latter, literally, being showcased in respected museums.

 

The Amazing Tattooed Lady

  

At the same time, I hate the idea of tattoos being fully accepted in society. Maybe that's something rebellious and me wanting to stand out from the crowd, but there's a huge difference between wanting a tattoo and the urge to be tattooed. Those who are covered in ink will know exactly what I mean.

How would you explain it for those without ink?

There's something special about enduring the process of getting tattooed. It's kind of a right of passage which goes beyond getting a permanent mark to celebrate or remind you of something. It truly becomes a part of life. Apart from a great deal of my arms being tattooed, I'm still an empty canvas waiting to be filled with great art.

Impossible not to notice all the tatted up women either. Any real life muses?

None to be really honest. I guess one of the perks of being able to draw is that you're able to visualize that perfect woman. Hahaha. Which can be a major downside, as well, if you know what I mean. But really, they mostly just stem from my mind. 

 
 
 
Mathilda

 

Rock the Casbah

 

Not one muse? How did you figure out what your "perfect woman" was?

Haha. I wasn't being totally serious about that. I haven't the slightest clue what the "perfect woman" would be. I'm quite sure she doesn't even exist. Haha.

Haha. So the real question then is 'Why do women play such a prominent role in your work?' 

Well, figurative art is much more interesting to me than anything else. From an artistic point of view, a woman's rounded and soft shapes are so much more interesting to me than a masculine shape. It's probably only natural to draw and paint certain features that I would find attractive in real life. This is something you're probably able to see with many artists throughout history.

I have a really hard time drawing handsome young men. You know - the CK model type guy. I like to draw guys, but I always want to draw them with an ugly mug and a beer gut. For drawing women this is completely opposite. I hope the women I draw aren't seen as the typical supermodel types either. Those are equally uninteresting to me. 

Otherwise, I always like to draw women with some form of power. Instead of depicting her sex appeal as degrading (like classic Gil Elvgren pinups for instance, which were kind of degrading), it's about empowering her. Often she's the seductress and she's always completely in charge of whatever event that may be.

Where does your interest in Japanese folklore stem from? 

I've always been very fascinated with Japanese culture. I don't consider myself a Japanophile. As in an obsessive fan of anything Japanese like manga, anime, games etc. Though I like it. Rather someone who loves feudal Japanese culture like the Samurai, traditional clothing, art and folklore. 

 

Irezumi

  

Tigerstyle

 

I'm always going through phases in which certain themes are massively interesting to me. I've had a freakshow circus and theater phase, the 1920s Americana, Victoriana etc. As of right now, I'm in a Japanese phase in which I'm exploring ways to implement traditional Japanese art, motifs and themes mixed with contemporary styles. Sort of like hybrids. Or take some part of mythology and turn it into a modern western-ish interpretation.

Cirque du Mort. I couldn't not ask. You a shit starter?

Haha. I do love to spark some controversy, but it's not the intention of this piece. I knew some people may find that illustration offensive, but it's, more or less, based on some visuals that popped up in my mind one day. It doesn't have any more meaning behind it. 

 

Cirque du Mort

  

Of course, I was fully aware that many, if not everybody, would see this as referring to a certain historical/religious figure, but why should you automatically assume this is a depiction of him? It could easily be a reference to anyone of the thousands of people who suffered the exact same death. The funny thing is that there hasn't been a single negative response, that I'm aware of, on this piece.

Are you doing more brush-to-canvas or digital these days?

I love both, but it's a lot of real painting lately. There's something special about being able to translate ideas using traditional media - working on an actual physical piece that you can touch and smell.

And you learned digital before stepping into real painting.

Yeah. I'm pretty much autodidact. I didn't have any serious former training in any technique, and I did actually learn to paint digitally first. Kind of the other way around I guess. It took a lot of trial and error and soaking everything up I could find on oil painting before I finally got comfortable with the medium. I'm nowhere near where I want to be. Will you ever? But I'm very happy with what I'm able to do right now and I'm honestly proud of the results.

 

The Getaway

 

Going back to your game design days, how did your time as a concept designer influence your career?

I didn't go the traditional art school route. I attended college and studied Multimedia Design, while minoring in Game Design and Development, because I wanted to work as a game artist. I've never been a hardcore gamer, but did love video games since early childhood - pre 8-bit.

Through contacts at college I started working freelance for some guys who started a small game studio. After graduation I got offered a full-time concept artist position, which I took. 

One thing I realized during those years is that I found it extremely difficult to work a 9-to-5 office job in which you have to be creative and produce art during set hours - week in week out. I ran more and more into those awful artists blocks and just didn't know how to solve them. Because it was such a small studio, I was the only concept artist. Thus, I couldn't find a solution through learning from or being inspired by a creative team - all the while feeling very guilty.

So, what happened? 

It resulted in a massive burn-out which completely drained my energy and any type of passion I once had. I was literally sick for about six months even though it drug on much longer than that.

That's rough.

Yeah. During the first wave of burn-out, I started working half days. Luckily my bosses were very understanding and compassionate, but they didn't know how to cope with this either. This couldn't continue on and because this was right when the economic crisis hit hard. They had to let me go.

This was followed by an incredibly insecure time that still hasn't completely let me go, but that's mostly financially. My mojo definitely, has been back for quite some time.

Any big takeaways from trading full-time for freelance? 

I learned that I get so much more satisfaction from doing just that what I want to do and get commissioned for that type of work. Since being on my own I've had the pleasure of working on illustrations that are right up my alley in theme and style and that's a factor I can get very excited about.

 

Chicana

 

Also, the fact that people like my personal work and are willing to buy prints and merchandise through Society6 is incredibly rewarding. It's a real honor actually. This isn't to say that I've given up on game art. I've actually done character designs for a Playstation 4 title for a major studio - still hush hush - and would love to do more work like this. I would love to get a team together and work on games or get hired by a cool studio, but I can't picture myself working full-time in an office environment anymore.

So, other than your sanity, what have you sacrificed to advance your art? 

Oh you know, a steady job and income, committed relationships, leading a normal life. That sort of stuff. Haha. No, I don't know really. I've been on this path forever and I really can't picture how it would be otherwise. It's all I know. I've known and still know hardship getting by, but it hasn't gotten in the way of my urge to advance in what I'm doing. It's a huge part of who I am and I wouldn't be me without it, so it's very difficult for me to answer this question and make some actual sense.

 

Ikuko's Ghost

 

Artist Interview: Rudy Faber

 

You own a pregnant mannequin.

Haha. That thing is a good example of what my mom finds on her treasure hunts in second hand stores and flea markets. I got a call from her one day saying she's staring at a pregnant mannequin torso. She was asking if she should take it home for me so I could paint it someday. I was like, "Alright. That's kind of weird, but sure." It's made of some sort of soft rubber material and I think it actually might hold some ink. I haven't done anything 'artsy' with it yet though. I actually kind of like it as an odd studio decoration.

Seems like your parents have been pretty big supporters?

My parents are awesome. They've always been and are still very supportive. It's hard trying to be an independent artist, but my parents never tried to convince me to pursue another career. They recently helped me hang paintings for a show, my mom printed and hung up pretty much anything I did in their own home and she likes everything I post on Facebook. Haha.

Haha. Any memorable responses from your parents?

A great response was quite recently when I told my mom on the phone that I got hired to illustrate a book for a major American publisher. She said, "Your dad and I want you to know we're proud of you son." I mean that's something everybody wants to hear from their parents, right? I consider myself lucky with my folks and, as an adult man, I still appreciate their involvement in my life very much.  which is just that: supporting.

 

Oyabun

 

Metaruu!

 

You've mentioned taking inspiration from rock n' roll. How has music played a role in what we see in your work?

I've done a handful music themed pieces and various portraits of famous musicians. There's almost always music playing in my house. Some of my earliest childhood memories are those of watching music videos on TV. I guess those were the good, early years of MTV. Music is almost as important to me as art is. Although I don't play any musical instruments myself or have a real ambition to do so.

Rudy put together this Spotify playlist for readers: Rudy Faber - Society6

Is this your painting playlist?

Just some of it. I have a very broad taste in music. I'm sure you'll find some clearly guilty pleasures in that list as well.

  

Bambi the Zombie Slayer

 

Any other big influencers on your work?  

Pfff. So many fellow artists. I'm really into contemporary realism such as the works by Soey Milk, Kris Lewis, Lu Cong, Kent Williams, Golucho just to name a few. Past-era realist painters like John Singer Sargent, Anders Zorn, the Dutch masters, of course. The guys who took it to another level and influenced so many others following in their footsteps like Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt. Artists in the lowbrow and pop-(sur)realism scene - Audrey Kawasaki, who I actually have a female face tattooed based on one of her works. Jeff Soto, Joao Ruas, Andrew Hem, Glenn Barr, James Jean and Travis Louis. I have a tattoo from one of Travis works as well.

Other than these artists, and I could literally list hundreds more, there's so many tattoo artists who influence me - which would be another couple hundred names. 

What advice would you have for aspiring artists?

Just do whatever you want to do. There will be a point when you realize this will, potentially, be a professional career or not. Still keep doing what you love no matter what. If this is not the time, maybe it'll come later in life, maybe not. But what I feel is true about art is that drive, that passion, that urge to want to create is all that it takes to get better at what you do.

If you are able to make a living off it at some point in your life then you're all set. It's not about the money. Itaz about being able to live and do what you love doing. But if you manage to reach that status in which people are willing to pay ridiculous amounts of money for your work, just freaking take it! Don't become a dick though!

Any cool opportunities from your work being on S6?

I get quite a lot of emails starting with asdf I/we saw your work on Society6...asdf. I've done several cool projects resulting from being on S6. These were mostly small brand t-shirt designs, often linked to the tattoo scene. Besides that, being on S6 has been a huge boost for my online presence.

Any artists you want to give a shout out to? 

Some artists on S6 that I really like are Giulio Rossi, Ruben Ireland, Teagan White, Michael Shapcott, Lindsey Carr, James M. Fenner and Conrad Roset.

 

See more:

Rudy Faber's Society6 Shop

 

Sites & socials:

Website

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

 

All images courtesy of the artist.

 

Artist Interviews

October 15
57Promote
Six Pack ::: 10.15.14

This week features Daniel Fishel, Alpha-Tone, Witchoria, Luigi Coari, KUBISM and Brian DeYoung.

The Six Pack showcases the diversity in style, medium, concept and genre found on Society6. With an ever-growing community, we think it's important to create opporunities for artists to connect with one another. This is one of those methods and these are a handful of artists our team has collectively discovered through our own exploration.

It might go without saying, but we all play a role in promoting one another. If something really speaks to you, promote it. If you'd buy an artist a beer, follow them.

Per usual, please share your own artist discoveries in the comments below!

 

Six Pack ::: 10.15.14
Post it notes
Six Pack ::: 10.15.14
Sacrificial
Six Pack ::: 10.15.14
Wedding Crasher
by KUBISM
Six Pack ::: 10.15.14
Don't stop to smell the roses
Six Pack ::: 10.15.14
Maro, Italy-India clash

 

Check out our last few Six Packs :::

Six Pack ::: 10.08.14

Six Pack ::: 10.01.14

Six Pack ::: 09.24.14

 

Six Pack

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