Framed Art Print

1970 Cadillac Eldorado

by Bruce Stanfield
$32.00

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DESCRIPTION

Choose from a variety of frame styles, colors and sizes to compliment your favorite Society6 gallery, or fine art print - made ready to hang. Fine-crafted from solid woods, premium shatterproof acrylic protects the face of the art print, while an acid free dust cover on the back provides a custom finish. All framed art prints include wall hanging hardware.

ABOUT THE ART

The Eldorado is a two-door personal luxury car manufactured and marketed by the Cadillac Division of General Motors from 1953 to 2002. Competitors included the Lincoln Mark series and the lower-priced Buick Riviera and Oldsmobile Toronado.
The Eldorado was at or near the top of the Cadillac line during early model years. The original 1953 Eldorado convertible and the Eldorado Brougham models of 1957–1960 were the most expensive models that Cadillac offered those years, and the Eldorado was never less than second in price after the Cadillac Series 75 until 1966. Eldorados bore the Fleetwood designation from 1965 through 1972.
Beginning in 1961, Cadillac marketed an upper trim level named after the French coastal resort, the Eldorado Biarritz.
The name "Eldorado" was proposed for a special show car built in 1952 to mark Cadillac's Golden Anniversary; it was the result of in-house competition won by Mary-Ann Marini (née Zukosky), a secretary in the company's merchandising department. Another source, Palm Springs Life magazine, attributes the name to a resort destination in California's Coachella Valley that was a favorite of General Motors executives. However, the Eldorado Country Club in Indian Wells, California was not founded until 1957 - five years after Cadillac's naming competition. In any case, the name was adopted by the company for a new, limited-edition convertible that was added to the line in 1953.
The name Eldorado was derived from the Spanish words "el dorado", which is translated "the gilded one" or "the golden one" in English; the name was originally given to the legendary chief or "cacique" of a South American Indian tribe. Legend has it that his followers would sprinkle his body with gold dust on ceremonial occasions and he would wash it off again by diving into a lake. The name more frequently refers to a legendary city of fabulous riches, somewhere in South America, that inspired many European expeditions, including one to the Orinoco by England's Sir Walter Raleigh.
Source: Wikipedia 2014

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